Monthly Archives: August 2008

2008 Fall TV Preview

Less is more on TV this season, at least when it comes to new shows. That’s because most of the shows starting up this fall really aren’t “new” at all.

There are only 18 bona fide “new” scripted series premiering this year (last year, there were almost 30). Some aren’t so much new as they are adaptations of popular overseas shows (the networks call this “reimagining”). The NBC sitcom Kath & Kim, based on an Australian comedy of the same name, falls in this category, as do Eleventh Hour and Worst Week on CBS, Life on Mars on ABC and Little Britain USA on HBO (all of which are “reimaginings” of British series). Then there are the holdovers from 2007-08: Pushing Daisies, Dirty Sexy Money and Private Practice on ABC, Life and Chuck on NBC. These shows all premiered last year, only to have their launches aborted due to the writers strike. Rather than bring them back last spring, the networks decided to “relaunch” them this season as if they were new (even though they’re not).

Confused? No worries. Here’s a brief look at what’s new, what’s sort of new, and the best of what’s coming back on broadcast television and cable:

For a complete list of all returning shows this season, click here:

Ed Robertson
Pop Culture Critic and Television Historian
Co-Host, TV CONFIDENTIAL
Every other Tuesday at 10:30pm ET, 7:30pm PT
Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org
www.edrobertson.com
www.tvconfidential.net
blog.tvconfidential.net
Also available as a podcast via iTunes

1 Comment

Filed under Annoucements, Articles, Contributor Authors, Entries by Ed Robertson, Events, In the News, Literature, Nonficition

Write What You Know

“I’m thinking about writing a book, but haven’t figured out what to write about yet.”  That’s a statement made to me quite often when I meet people during signings, a writer’s workshop or readings.  It has always puzzled me.  I guess it’s the ‘what came first, the chicken or the egg?’ thing.  Usually something happens that I’m reacting to (good, bad, ugly, whatever) that compels me to write.  So my response, which I feel a person is looking for, is “probably the wisest thing to do is write about what you know.”  Everyone has an interesting story, if not quite a few.  Really. If it’s not their personal story, it’s something they’ve heard  or witnessed.  Some people have exceptional interpersonal skills and can word weave captivating and unique relationships that are intriguing to read, while others have a gaming mind that can fill us with suspense or terror.  There are still others who can inspire us by sharing personal experiences where they’ve gained or lost (either way, learned from) that give us knowledge we can use to enrich and improve our lives.  Maybe written emotional purging is cheap therapy we engage in that will indirectly enable others to also derive benefits.  Writing doesn’t always have to become a book, though. I’ve completed only two books, but additional personal experiences, causes and concerns or longings have become stories, articles, poetry or even a blog post.  After advising an aspiring author to “write what you know,” I follow  up with, “ask yourself why you want others to know what you know; to awaken them and hope for deep thought, provide information, education or entertainment?    The answer to “why do you want others to know what you know?”  will usually drive you in the right topic direction.   Try not to throw up roadblocks, such as “nobody would be interested in that” or “there’s nothing special about me or what I know.”  I’m always surprised (but not shocked) by what others don’t know.  What our brains contain may seem second nature to us but brand new to those who’ve walked a different life’s path.  There is so much to know and life to live, how can anyone possibly know and have done it all.    So if you truly want to write a book, go for it!!  Teach me to maintain beehives or tell me what it’s  like to to be a bike courier in New York or if you’ve been married eighteen times, I’m curious enough to want to know how each began and how each ended or if you haven’t lived on land for the past fifteen years, maybe it’s time to drop anchor for a while, steady yourself next to a 60 watt bulb and write about every wind and wave that kept you out at sea.  Someone always wants to know what you know.   Who?  Now that’s a marketing question.

 

 Linda Bergman-Althouse,  author of, “Save Them All

Dinah, from the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter says Hello!

1 Comment

Filed under Articles, Essays, The Writing Life, Writing

Remembering William Conrad and Isaac Hayes on TV CONFIDENTIAL

In you case you missed it, last week’s edition of TV CONFIDENTIAL is now available on the archives page of our website, www.tvconfidential.net. Paul Robert Coyle joined Frankie and me in our look back at the career of William Conrad, from his radio work on Gunsmoke, to his behind-the-scenes work as head of Warner Bros. Television, from his versatility as Narrator on Rocky & Bullwinkle and The Fugitive, to his starring roles in Cannon and Jake and The Fatman. We also paid tribute to Isaac Hayes and his work with James Garner on The Rockford Files.

Ed Robertson
Pop Culture Critic and Television Historian
Co-Host, TV CONFIDENTIAL
Every other Tuesday at 10:3opm ET, 7:30pm PT
Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org
www.edrobertson.com
www.tvconfidential.net
blog.tvconfidential.net
Also available as a podcast via iTunes

Leave a comment

Filed under Annoucements, Articles, Contributor Authors, Entries by Ed Robertson, In the News, Nonficition

Standing His Ground: Brian Copeland finds humor while reliving the pain of isolation in “Not a Genuine Black Man”

Brian Copeland is one of the top voices on KGO radio, but he also knows his television. When he first developed Not a Genuine Black Man – his riveting one-man show about growing up black in San Leandro in the early 1970s, at a time when the East Bay suburb was notoriously 99.9 percent white and determined to keep it that way – he set out to capture the style of All in the Family, Good Times, Maude and other groundbreaking comedies produced by Norman Lear, where the audience finds themselves laughing hysterically one moment and sobbing the next. “It would be really funny – then you’d find out Edith got raped, and you’d go, ‘Where in the hell did that came from?’” he explains. “Or you’d watch Good Times, there’d be a hilarious line, then all of a sudden J.J. gets shot by a gangbanger. So when I wrote the show, I knew the rhythms I wanted were the rhythms of Norman Lear.”

Copeland nails those rhythms in Genuine, the long-running San Francisco solo show from 2004 that recently debuted in San Jose after successful runs in Los Angeles and off-Broadway. The show runs at the Historic Hoover Theater through Aug. 24. At a time when Barack Obama calls for a national discussion on race in America, Copeland provides that and more in a two-hour roller-coaster ride that explores how our surroundings (and surviving them) make us who we are.

For the complete interview with Brian Copeland, and to learn more about his one-man show, click here.

Ed Robertson
www.edrobertson.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Contributor Authors, Entries by Ed Robertson, Events, In the News, Nonficition, Stories

No Wonder I Fell In Love

Ansel Adam’s Photo

Art is both love and friendship and understanding: the desire to give. It is not charity, which is the giving of things. It is more than kindness, which is the giving of self. It is both the taking and giving of beauty, the turning out to the light of the inner folds of the awareness of the spirit. It is a recreation on another plane of the realities of the world; the tragic and wonderful realities of earth and men, and of all the interrelations of these.

– Ansel Adams, in a letter to Cedric Wright

Ansel Adams was photographer and environmentalist. I went to see an exhibition of his work a little over a year ago and was really impressed with it. The extend of his trips and the ordeals and sacrifices he went through just to capture with his lens the beauty of God’s creation inspired me to look more in detail and try to capture its beauty in my own photography. His deep love for what he photographed obviously made him aware of the great need to protect it.

I love the arts and tried my hand at a few of them (painting, photography and writing) but the one I fell in love with the most were the words. Words to me are the vehicle to express my thoughts, views and feelings towards life and to those great questions every one has. I never knew to what extend the words I wrote would touch so many hearts and everytime someone tells me how much it means to them, I just can’t help it but I’m almost moved to tears. To me it is a gift from God to be able to read and then write the way I do. I don’t pretend to know it all but in my ignorance I’m always looking to learn more about so many things. One of them is how to better live my life and how to share it with others. We writers work alone but we are never quite lonely. My mind is usually between my world, and my situations and what I have learned or heard from you; it is at that moment of my writing that all those experiences merge and create the words you read here or on my books, and I believe that is why we have a connection.

Another reason why I fell in love with words is because when I can’t say what I feel, it is in my writing that all of that gets its way out of my system. To me writing is like breathing, something I can’t be without. I wish to continue sharing my words with you in the many different ways my spirit moves me and may you blessed, enlighten, and inspired to do the same with whatever gift God has given to you. May it bring you the joy that words and writing brings to me, and may you be able to touch many lives with it.

###
Clary Lopez, author of Simplicity, Richness of Life
Clary’s Blog

Leave a comment

Filed under Entries by Clary Lopez, The Writing Life, Writing

TV CONFIDENTIAL: Premiering Tuesday, Aug. 12 on Share-a-Vision Radio

In case you missed it, last week we announced that Dave White has officially handed over the reins of Talking Television, and that Frankie Montiforte and I will be taking over as hosts of the program beginning Tuesday, Aug. 12 at 10:30pm ET, 7:30pm PT on Share-a-Vision Radio. As we also announced last week, the program will now be called TV CONFIDENTIAL, and will be broadcast every other Tuesday at 10:30pm ET, 7:30pm PT (instead of weekly, as before).

Other than those two changes, TV CONFIDENTIAL will be the same program you know as Talking Television, only with different hosts. We’ll have many of the same features, such as our DVD report and David Krell’s commentary, plus we’ll continue to take you behind the scenes of your favorite shows and pay tribute to your favorite TV personalities. In fact, on our Tuesday, Aug. 12 program, we’ll look back at the career of William Conrad—from his early days as the radio voice of Matt Dillon to his memorable work as the narrator on Rocky & Bullwinkle and, of course, The Fugitive, from his behind-the-scenes work as a TV producer to his starring roles in Cannon and Jake and The Fatman.

Paul Robert Coyle, who worked with Bill on Jake and The Fatman, will be joining us on Tuesday, Aug. 12… we hope you’ll join us, too.

In the meantime, if you would to be on our email list for future announcements, or if you have an idea for a future program, please email us at our website, www.tvconfidential.net. As a matter of fact, the idea for our tribute to William Conrad originated from a regular listener—so we definitely want to hear from you!

Finally, as we also announced last week, the reason Dave is stepping aside is that he will be launching a new program, DAVE WHITE PRESENTS, beginning Tuesday, Aug. 19 at 10:30pm ET, 7:30pm PT on Share-a-Vision Radio. DAVE WHITE PRESENTS will then alternate with TV CONFIDENTIAL in the Tuesday, 10:30pm ET, 7:30pm PT time slot. You can learn more about Dave’s new show by going to www.audioentertainment.org.

Ed Robertson
Pop Culture Critic and Television Historian
Co-Host, TV CONFIDENTIAL
Every other Tuesday at 10:3opm ET, 7:30pm PT
beginning Aug. 12 on Share-a-Vision Radio, KSAV.org
www.edrobertson.com
www.tvconfidential.net

Leave a comment

Filed under Annoucements, Entries by Ed Robertson, Events, In the News

EL DUENDE PARTICULAR


Al doblar la curva del río, entre la espesura de hayas, hay una gran piedra plana, redonda, semiroída en uno de sus cantos. Sentado en ella, apoyado sobre la cagiga milenaria puede contemplarse el río. El agua juega y arremolina espuma entre los surcos de las rocas enmohecidas. Un hilo de luz se asoma por el techo de hojas y, desde arriba, dibuja un arcoiris en la orilla, un manto multicolor que envuelve al hada del arpa, que danza y deja bailar sus dorados cabellos al sol, rodeada por un séquito de diminutos duendes, numerosos y curiosos, que se acercan y rodean la gran piedra plana. Algunos, de nariz arrugada, son feos y se esconden detrás de los árboles. El más bello se acerca y mueve los labios. No me habla, pero le escucho y, mientras se acompaña de suaves movimientos y ademanes delicados, me explica que lo veo porque soy niño. Se llama Particular, respondiendo a mi pregunta y continúa explicándome que él es el duende que me corresponde. Sí, de acuerdo al carácter de cada uno nos acompaña uno u otro duende y, por un instante, suspiro aliviado de que no sea uno de los que se ocultan tras las peñas. Con gestos elegantes se da prisa en aclararme que no somos niños siempre, que luego crecemos y es natural que así sea, pero que perdemos el alma niña y nuestro espíritu queda enturbiado por el tiempo. Después, un día, cuando contamos el secreto desaparece finalmente el hechizo.
Aún resuena el eco del duende en mis recuerdos. A la entrada del río, hoy, un cartel de grandes letras se anuncia: “Se Vende Finca Particular”… Lleva ahí tantos años como los que yo anduve fuera del hogar. Ahora sé que no existe riqueza alguna capaz de comprar lo que ese bosque esconde. Y si lo hubiera, andaría igualmente sobrado de ignorancia al desconocer el verdadero valor de tesoro tan incalculable.
…Hoy espero al otro lado del puente y, desde la orilla, a veces veo llegar algún niño que regresa por el camino vecinal, junto al río. No parecen ni tristes ni alegres… Son sólo niños, verdaderos niños que el río contempla a su paso.

El autor:
http://leetamargo.blogspot.com
*”Es una Colección “Son Relatos”, (c) Luis Tamargo.-

2 Comments

Filed under Historias y Cuentos, Luis Tamargo, Stories